Let’s talk about the weather

The  Tammar wallabies are practically breaking down the fences to get to some moderately green feed in my garden.

Who can blame them?

The rainfall chart for 2015 does not look pretty – the total for my eastern Penneshaw block is 396.5 mL, that’s more than 21% less than the long-term average (503 mL from 1911 until official records for the town stopped in 1998; 541 mL since 2008 for my block).

Since 10 September, a mere 55 mL has fallen, 27.5 mL (exactly half) in one episode in early November.

Dust puffs up with each footstep, the ants are into everything in their thirst for water and the drooping she-oaks (Allocasuarina verticillata) that surround my house are dropping leaves in big piles.

The piles of casuarina leaves and cones are more than 20cm deep in places
The piles of casuarina leaves and cones are more than 20cm deep in places

The she-oak cones are the sole food of the Endangered Glossy Black-cockatoo (Calyptorynchus lathami halmaturinus). If young healthy trees are dropping leaves in December to protect their roots from drying out, will they survive to the end of summer?

 

And my dilemma is that they pose a fire hazard but I don’t want to stress the trees further by cleaning them up, just in case a fire comes my way.

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